Military
War Memorial File

 

GUNNER CHARLES WILLIAM VICTOR TAYLOR.

112th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.

Service number; 146339.

Died on August 2nd 1917.

Aged 20 years.


COMMEMORATION;

Menin Road South Military Cemetery,
Ieper,
West-Vlaanderen,
Belgium.
Menin Road North Memorial I.


GUNNER CHARLES WILLIAM VICTOR TAYLOR.

Died August 2nd 1917, aged 20 years.

Son of Richard and Miriam Taylor, of Malting House, Maffit Road, Ailesworth, Peterborough.

Report copied from The Peterborough Standard, dated September 1st 1917.

GUNNER CHARLES WILLIAM VICTOR TAYLOR, Howitzer Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Taylor, of Ailesworth, was killed in action in France. Official notice of the sad event has not yet arrived, but on Thursday, August 23rd, the following letter was received by Mrs. Taylor:

Dear Madam, - Enclosed please find a few letters, etc, of your son, Gunner C. W.
Taylor. I regret the delay in sending them to you although the letters have only
just been found. Please accept the deepest sympathy of all ranks of his battery.
Your son, like a number of others, has been badly missed by us all. It was while doing his duty bravely against great odds, that he was killed. A grave was provided, and the Chaplain, as is usual, conducted a service. Again sending you my deepest sympathy. - I remain, yours sincerely.
BDR. W. D. SUMMERS.

The sad news, caused great grief in the village, for Gunner Taylor was a great and general favourite with all who knew him. Though only 20 years old, he was a tall, fine-looking fellow and showed great promise. He was of a most amiable and cheerful disposition and very intelligent. After leaving school he was telegraph boy at Castor Post Office for several years, and so quick, willing and obliging was he, that everyone was sorry (in one sense), when he was promoted to Peterborough Post Office. Here again he became very much liked and soon won promotion. He was always so trustworthy and did his work so well, that there is no doubt he would have attained a good position in post office work had not the war stopped his career. He joined the Army quite voluntarily on May 10th, 1916, and soon became a brave and gallant soldier, much liked and esteemed by his comrades and officers. Wherever he went (and he was stationed some time in the North of England and Scotland), he always made friends, and his death will be deeply regretted by many. A staunch Churchman, he was a regular attendant and communicant wherever he was stationed. Whilst living at home he was a member of the Parish Church choir, and a member of the Rectory Bible Class, and for some time belonged to the Castor Scouts. He was always ready to do a good turn to anyone, and his bright and cheerful face and pleasant manner endeared him to all with whom he came in contact. He leaves a bright memory behind him, which must be a great comfort to Mr. and Mrs. Taylor and family in their sad bereavement. A memorial service was held in the Parish Church on Sunday and was well attended by relatives, friends and parishioners. Mr. and Mrs. R. Taylor (parents), Mr. and Mrs. W. Taylor (grandparents), the Misses B. and G. Taylor (aunts), Mr. F. Taylor and Mr. J. Taylor (brothers), Mr. and Mrs. C. Allen (Peterborough), and many others were present. Canon Hulbert preached a helpful and comforting sermon and spoke most highly of deceased’s many good qualities. The hymns chosen by the parents were:- “Rock of Ages”. “Nearer my God to Thee,” and “Lead kindly light.” The service throughout was most solemn and impressive. Many letters from sympathising friends have been received by Mr. and Mrs. Taylor. Over the Roll of Honour in the Church porch some beautiful flowers were placed on Sunday in memory of the deceased. They bore the following inscriptions; “In ever-loving memory of our darling boy,” from his sorrowing father and mother, brothers and sisters, grandad and grandma, and aunties Lizzie and Gertie - “Gone, but never forgotten” : “In loving remembrance of Charlie Taylor, and with deepest sympathy with his parents,” the Rosary, Ailesworth: “In loving memory of “Charlie Taylor,” from H. Q. Deceased was for several years agent at Castor for the “Peterborough Standard.”

There is a memorial stone in Castor churchyard with the following inscription:

Gunner C. W. V. Taylor
Of the 112th Howitzer Brigade R. F. A.
Eldest son of
Richard and Miriam Taylor.
Killed in action at Ypres,
in Belgium.
August 2nd 1917.
And was buried East of Ypres On the Menin Road.
Aged 20 years.


Also on the gravestone there is an inscription to his sister, Phyllis Mary, who died on January 11th 1931, aged 26 years.